Coffee could boost the effect of breast cancer drug tamoxifen

Two cups of coffee a day HALVES the risk of breast cancer returning by boosting the effect of medication With tamoxifen, coffee could halve the rate of breast cancer recurrence Tamoxifen works by stopping oestrogen reaching the tumour cells Oestrogen causes tumour cells to divide meaning that the tumour grows Researchers don't know why coffee makes the drug more effective By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 11:42 GMT, 26 April 2013 | UPDATED: 11:42 GMT, 26 April 2013 DM.has('shareLink', 'shareLinks', { 'id': '2315186', 'title': 'Two cups of coffee a day HALVES the risk of breast cancer returning by boosting the effect of medication', 'url': 'http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2315186/Coffee-boost-effect-breast-cancer-drug-tamoxifen.html', 'eTwitterStatus': 'Coffee%20could%20boost%20the%20effect%20of%20breast%20cancer%20drug%20tamoxifen%20http://bit.ly/15LVZUv%20via%[email protected]' }); Drinking two cups of coffee a day could stop breast cancer recurring in recovering patients, new research has revealed.

End of the diabetes jab? Scientists find insulin-boosting hormone that could do away with daily injections

End of the diabetes jab Scientists find insulin-boosting hormone that could do away with daily injections A newly discovered hormone – betatrophin – could revolutionise the treatment of type 2 diabetesIt could halt the development of the conditionIn mice the hormone was shown to increase the number of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold By Fiona Macrae Science Correspondent PUBLISHED: 16:00 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 23:47 GMT, 25 April 2013 Diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves by the development of a once-a-year drug Millions of diabetics could be freed from having to inject themselves several times a day by a once-a-year drug.

Could bad gut bacteria be responsible for thousands of heart attacks each year?

Could gut bacteria be to blame for thousands of heart attacks each yearStudy has found that bugs in gut are responsible for converting food into harmful compound called TMAOTMAO is a compound responsible for cholesterol building up on artery walls and hardening the arteriesAdds to research that bacteria, both on and inside the body, play vital role in our health By Rachel Reilly PUBLISHED: 15:57 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 15:57 GMT, 25 April 2013 Gut bacteria may be responsible for thousands of heart attacks – particularly in people who have no obvious risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol.

Once-a-year drug could spell the end of daily insulin injections for type 2 diabetics

Once-a-year drug could spell the end of daily insulin injections for type 2 diabetics A newly discovered hormone – betatrophin – could revolutionise the treatment of type 2 diabetesIt could halt the development of the conditionIn mice the hormone was shown to increase the number of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold By Fiona Macrae Science Correspondent PUBLISHED: 16:00 GMT, 25 April 2013 | UPDATED: 16:04 GMT, 25 April 2013 Diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves by the development of a once-a-year drug Millions of diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves several times a day by the development of a once-a-year drug.

Maternal instinct is a myth: Mothers and fathers are equally good at recognising their baby"s cry

Is maternal instinct a myth Mothers and fathers are EQUALLY good at recognising their baby's cry A parent's ability to identify their baby's cry is determined by the amount of time they spend with the child, not by their gender By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 09:21 GMT, 17 April 2013 | UPDATED: 12:45 GMT, 17 April 2013 Maternal instinct may not be all that it is cracked up to be, according to new research.

Life-saving "wonder plaster" that glows when it detects deadly infections

Life-saving 'wonder plaster' that glows when it detects deadly infections The new plaster is designed to detect the early signs of Toxic Shock Syndrome – a potentially fatal infectionIt releases dye, only visible in UV light, from nanocapsules when disease-causing bacteria is presentCurrent methods of detecting the condition take up to 48 hours and patients often die waiting for diagnosis By Emma Innes PUBLISHED: 14:32 GMT, 26 March 2013 | UPDATED: 14:33 GMT, 26 March 2013 British scientists have developed a new 'wonder plaster' which glows when it detects infection.

New drug that may help reverse autism is to be tested on children for the first time after successful clinical trials on mice

New drug that may help reverse autism is to be tested on children for the first time after successful clinical trials on mice Drug called suramin is already used to treat sleeping sickness in AfricaScientists in the U.S.

It"s official: Women ARE grumpier than men in the mornings

It's official: Women ARE grumpier than men in the morningsWomen are more angry and hostile if they get insufficient sleep, say North Carolina scientistsSleep deprivation also increases women's risk of heart disease, stroke and depression But a man's health is barely affected by lack of sleep By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 17:15 GMT, 12 March 2013 | UPDATED: 23:30 GMT, 12 March 2013 If the woman in your life woke up grumpy this morning, don’t be too hard on her.

Sex is a "better headache cure than painkillers": 1 in 5 migraine sufferers had no symptoms after sex

Got a headache Try a little passion instead of a painkiller: One in five migraine sufferers had no symptoms after sex More than half of migraine sufferers who had sex during an attack experienced an improvement in symptomsOne in five were left without any pain at all, researchers found By Lucy Osborne PUBLISHED: 00:49 GMT, 4 March 2013 | UPDATED: 13:46 GMT, 4 March 2013 'Not tonight – I haven't got a headache' If you're suffering from a headache, retiring to bed may be the best solution.

Infants born by C-section are five times more likely to develop allergies

Caesarean babies at higher risk of allergies: Infants born by C-section are five times more likely to suffer common reactions Babies left vulnerable by avoiding natural journey through birth canalThe journey would normally expose the baby to their mother's bacteriaBy the age of two, C-section babies more likely to have developed allergies By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 22:55 GMT, 24 February 2013 | UPDATED: 23:55 GMT, 24 February 2013 Caesarian birth greatly increases a baby’s chances of developing allergies, a study has found.