Grey, saggy skin, wrinkles and jowls: The stop-smoking "time machine" app that shows exactly what the habit will do to your face

Grey, saggy skin, wrinkles and jowls: The stop-smoking app that shows exactly what the habit will do to your face App shows smokers just how much they will ravage their looks Ages the face by up to 20 years to display effects of chemicals in cigarettesHas been designed to encourage younger people to quit before it's too late40 per cent of regular smokers took up the habit before they were 16 By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 16:46 GMT, 19 March 2013 | UPDATED: 17:15 GMT, 19 March 2013 A new smartphone app has been created to show smokers just how much they will ravage their looks if they continue to light up.

Average smoker makes four failed attempts to give up the habit before they finally do so

Average smoker makes four failed attempts to give up the habit before they finally do soOf the 2,010 smokers questioned one in ten said they are 'desperate' to stop British Heart Foundation found 82 per cent have unsuccessfully tried to quitReport calls for standardised packaging and local authority assistance By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED: 01:48 GMT, 13 March 2013 | UPDATED: 08:17 GMT, 13 March 2013 Tough: Research by the British Heart Foundation found that 82 per cent of smokers have unsuccessfully tried to quit at some stage The average smoker has made four failed attempts to quit and nearly a quarter have lost count of the number of times they have tried to give up.

Smokers who stop by 44 can live almost as long as those who never took up the habit

Quit while you're ahead Smokers who stop by 44 can live almost as long as those who never took up the habit Long-term habit cuts 10 years off your lifespanHowever, quitting by 44 gives you back nine yearsExperts add it doesn't mean you're safe to smoke into middle age as increases risk of diseases such as cancer By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 11:37 GMT, 24 January 2013 | UPDATED: 11:43 GMT, 24 January 2013 Quit while you're ahead Smokers who give up by the age of 44 were found to increase their life expectancy by nine years compared to those who continue to puff away Smokers who quit before they hit middle ages can live almost as long as people who never smoked, groundbreaking new research has found.

Electronic cigarettes "DON"T help fight addiction and cause harm to health"

Electronic cigarettes 'DON'T help fight addiction and cause harm to health'New report warns electronic cigarettes do not help smokers quitGadgets still posed a health risk, although not as serious as real cigarettesExperts warned their use could lead young people on to real cigarettes | UPDATED: 16:48 GMT, 30 December 2012 They are used by thousands of smokers who are either looking to kick the habit or just for a healthier alternative.

Stop smoking ad: Cancerous tumour grows out of cigarette in new anti-smoking campaign

Is this the most disgusting anti-smoking advert yet Cancerous tumour seen growing inside cigarette in New Year campaign Department of Health ad, which cost 2.7m, will run for nine weeks on television, billboards and onlineLaunched in response to statistics which show more than a third of smokers still think the health risks are greatly exaggerated | UPDATED: 10:08 GMT, 28 December 2012 This gruesome image of a tumour growing from a cigarette is part of the Government's latest attempt to get millions of Britons to stop smoking.

Cystic fibrosis sufferer Jennifer Wederell given smoker"s lungs in transplant dies of cancer

Cystic fibrosis sufferer given smoker's lungs in transplant died of cancer less than a year after operationJennifer Wederell was given the lungs of a 20-a-day smokerA year after the operation she died of cancer Husband says she would never have agreed to transplant had she known | UPDATED: 11:57 GMT, 17 December 2012 Battle: Jennifer Wederell died at the age of 27 from lung cancer.

Cystic fibrosis sufferer given smoker"s lungs in transplant died of cancer less than a year after operation

Cystic fibrosis sufferer given smoker's lungs in transplant died of cancer less than a year after operationJennifer Wederell was given the lungs of a 20-a-day smokerA year after the operation she died of cancer Husband says she would never have agreed to transplant had she known | UPDATED: 01:04 GMT, 17 December 2012 Battle: Jennifer Wederell died at the age of 27 from lung cancer.

Meningitis link to smoking in pregnancy: Cigarettes can treble child"s chance of developing the disease

Meningitis link to smoking in pregnancy: Cigarettes can treble child’s chance of developing the disease | UPDATED: 01:24 GMT, 10 December 2012 Scientists estimate that more than 600 children a year in Britain develop meningitis as a result of their parents' second-hand smoke (pictured posed by model) Smoking during pregnancy can treble the baby’s chance of developing meningitis, researchers warn, and children exposed to smoke from a parent’s cigarettes at home are twice as likely to have the deadly illness.

Smoking harms your brain as well as your body: It leads to sharp decline in mental ability, warns study

Smoking harms your brain as well as your body: It leads to sharp decline in mental ability, warns study Test on nearly 9,000 people over 50 have shown lifestyles could damage the mind as well as the bodySmoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a high BMI all worsen the risk | UPDATED: 00:30 GMT, 27 November 2012 Tests on 8,800 people over 50 have showed cigarettes can damage memory Smoking is known to be highly damaging to physical health, being a major factor in cancer and heart disease.

"Uncool" teenagers take up smoking to fit in with their peers

I wanna be in your gang: 'Uncool' teenagers take up smoking to fit in with their peers<br> The lower a person's street cred is at school the liklier they are to become a regular or heavy smoker later onUnpopular teenagers may come to believe in their low status that could influence unhealthy life choices, say experts <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 14:02 GMT, 21 November 2012 </p> <br><p>Films and old TV shows may have portrayed smokers as part of the high school elite, but research has shown it is the 'nerds' who are most likely to pick up the habit.<br></p><p>A study from Sweden has revealed that having a low peer status as a teenager is a strong risk factor for regular and heavy smoking in adulthood.</p><p>The lower a person's street cred was at school the more likely they were to continue the unhealthy habit later on.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236280-1625C717000005DC-773_468x373.jpg" width="468" height="373" alt="Outcast Having low status at school could encourage teenagers to smoker, say researchers" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Outcast Having low status at school could encourage teenagers to smoker, say researchers</p> <p> Researchers from Stockholm University in Sweden used a large database that followed 15,000 people mainly from the Stockholm area, from birth to middle age.