How your grandmother"s smoking habit could affect YOUR health: Cigarettes can affect many generations down the line

How your grandmother's smoking habit could give YOU asthma The risk holds even if your mother didn't take up the habit, say expertsNicotine can leave a 'mark' on our DNA, making future generations more susceptible to respiratory conditions such as asthma By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 16:33 GMT, 5 March 2013 | UPDATED: 17:19 GMT, 5 March 2013 People whose grandmothers smoked during pregnancy are more likely yo suffer from asthma – regardless of whether their mother smoked or not Having a grandmother who smoked can increase your risk of suffering from asthma – even if your mother didn't take up the habit.

Health minister wants ban on smoking in cars to help protect children from second-hand smoke

Health minister wants ban on smoking in cars to help protect children from second-hand smokeConfined space means the fumes other passengers breathe in can be 11 times more concentratedAround 300,000 children in the UK visit the GP each year due to second-hand smoke By Tamara Cohen PUBLISHED: 23:47 GMT, 26 February 2013 | UPDATED: 15:47 GMT, 27 February 2013 Anna Soubry is the first frontbencher to suggest the proposal Smoking in cars should be banned to protect children from second-hand smoke, a health minister declared yesterday.

Smokers who stop by 44 can live almost as long as those who never took up the habit

Quit while you're ahead Smokers who stop by 44 can live almost as long as those who never took up the habit Long-term habit cuts 10 years off your lifespanHowever, quitting by 44 gives you back nine yearsExperts add it doesn't mean you're safe to smoke into middle age as increases risk of diseases such as cancer By Claire Bates PUBLISHED: 11:37 GMT, 24 January 2013 | UPDATED: 11:43 GMT, 24 January 2013 Quit while you're ahead Smokers who give up by the age of 44 were found to increase their life expectancy by nine years compared to those who continue to puff away Smokers who quit before they hit middle ages can live almost as long as people who never smoked, groundbreaking new research has found.

Just one cigarette a day doubles a woman"s risk of having a fatal heart attack

Just one cigarette a day doubles a woman's risk of having a fatal heart attack | UPDATED: 21:03 GMT, 11 December 2012 Habit-forming: On average, those in the study who smoked reported that they started in their late teens Women who smoke as little as one a day are at higher risk of dying suddenly from heart attack and other heart problems, warn researchers.

Meningitis link to smoking in pregnancy: Cigarettes can treble child"s chance of developing the disease

Meningitis link to smoking in pregnancy: Cigarettes can treble child’s chance of developing the disease | UPDATED: 01:24 GMT, 10 December 2012 Scientists estimate that more than 600 children a year in Britain develop meningitis as a result of their parents' second-hand smoke (pictured posed by model) Smoking during pregnancy can treble the baby’s chance of developing meningitis, researchers warn, and children exposed to smoke from a parent’s cigarettes at home are twice as likely to have the deadly illness.

Smoking doesn"t just age your lungs, it damages your BRAIN, too

Smoking doesn't just age your lungs, it damages your BRAIN, too Test on nearly 9,000 people over 50 have shown lifestyles could damage the mind as well as the bodySmoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a high BMI all worsen the risk | UPDATED: 11:28 GMT, 26 November 2012 Tests on 8,800 people over 50 have showed cigarettes can damage memory The effects of smoking on the skin are well documented with those keen to stay looking young urged to stub out the cigarettes.

Hospital criticised for turning bike racks into a SMOKING shelter

Hospital criticised for turning bike racks into a SMOKING shelter<br> <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 14:40 GMT, 23 November 2012 </p> <p>One of the UK&#8217;s leading NHS hospitals has come under fire for turning a bike shelter into a smoking area.</p><p>Racks which hold around 60 bicycles are being removed from the grounds of Addenbrooke&#8217;s Hospital in Cambridge to make room for smokers to have a cigarette undercover.</p><p>But cycling campaigners says the hospital is sending out the wrong message by making the switch.</p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/23/article-2237434-162D542B000005DC-744_468x286.jpg" width="468" height="286" alt="Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge has been criticised for turning a bike shelter into a smoking area" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge has been criticised for turning a bike shelter into a smoking area</p> <p>Robin Heydon, of Cambridge Cycling Campaign, said: 'Addenbrooke&#8217;s is already overflowing with bikes, so to remove bike parking, especially to put in a smoking shelter, seems completely and entirely against what the NHS should be about.'</p><p>The bike shelter is near the hospital&#8217;s 'S' block, but it is being turned into a smoking shelter as part of a hospital revamp of its major trauma centre.</p><p>A Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) spokesman said the new scheme would see 138 new cycle places provided on the site, which will mean room for an extra 79 bikes.

Heart attacks among non-smokers fall by a QUARTER after ban stubs out passive smoking

Heart attacks among non-smokers fall by a QUARTER after ban stubs out passive smoking | UPDATED: 11:45 GMT, 28 August 2012 Smoking bans brought in to reduce exposure to secondhand smoke can have a dramatic impact on public health, say researchers.