Does the menopause really make you forgetful? Yes, but not for long, say scientists

Does the menopause really make you forgetful Yes, but only for the first year Memory loss is worse in the year after the last periodBut is likely to only be temporary, say experts Symptoms such as changing hormone levels, sleep problems and anxiety are not linked to cognitive decline PUBLISHED: 16:16 GMT, 3 January 2013 | UPDATED: 16:18 GMT, 3 January 2013 Memory loss: Experts say that forgetfulness is most common in the year after a woman's last period If you blame losing your house keys on the menopause making you forgetful, you might be onto something.

The battle against Alzheimer"s starts at school age: Research pinpoints three key stages that help keep disease at bay

The battle against Alzheimer's starts at school age: Research pinpoints three key stages that help keep disease at bay A person's education, their working life, and their social life in later years all play a role in keeping the mind sharper for longerPeople who were more mentally active found to have a lower risk of developing memory problems in old age, according to study | UPDATED: 07:55 GMT, 13 December 2012 It is often dismissed as a disease of old age.

Sarah Catt: Eight years for the cheating wife who used drugs bought online to abort baby TWO days before it was due to be born

Eight years for the cheating wife who used drugs bought online to abort baby TWO days before it was due to be born Sarah Catt, 35, aborted her unborn baby “in the final stages of pregnancy”She admitted administering poison with intent to procure a miscarriageShe was jailed for eight years by a judge at Leeds Crown Court.Convicted: Sarah Catt (front), who aborted her own baby within a week of his due date, was sentenced to eight years in prison by a judge at Leeds Crown Court A MARRIED woman who aborted her baby in the final week of pregnancy following an affair with a work colleague was jailed for eight years yesterday.

Pregnant woman refused cancer treatment to save unborn baby miraculously recovers

'I feel like we've won the lottery': Pregnant woman who refused cancer treatment to save unborn baby makes miraculous recovery Jo Powell, 41, discovered lump in her breast days after finding out she was pregnant with first child | UPDATED: 21:09 GMT, 28 August 2012 Miracle babes: Jo Powell risked her own life by refusing treatment for breast cancer during her pregnancy with son Jake It is a decision no expectant mother should have to face.

Drink a day for pregnant women "won"t harm baby"

A drink a day for pregnant women 'will NOT harm unborn baby's development' | UPDATED: 00:34 GMT, 20 June 2012 The study is the first significant evidence that occasional binge drinking in the early stages of pregnancy will not harm a baby Drinking alcohol while trying to conceive or in early pregnancy – even the occasional binge – will not harm the baby’s development, research has claimed.

Miracle boy, 2, survives after his heart stops beating for 39 MINUTES and family told to prepare for the worst

Miracle boy, 2, survives after his heart stops beating for 39 MINUTES and family told to prepare for the worst | UPDATED: 16:55 GMT, 8 June 2012 A two-year-old boy has survived after his heart stopped beating for 39 minutes and his family was told to prepare for the worst.

Restricted embryo growth in early pregnancy could predict risk of miscarriage

Restricted embryo growth in early pregnancy could predict risk of miscarriage May lead to ways of preventing such tragedies Indicator: The distance between the embryo's head and buttocks during the early stages of pregnancy could be used to predict the risk of miscarriage Scientists have found a link between miscarriages and the growth of an embryo in the early stages of pregnancy which could lead to ways of preventing such tragedies. Researchers discovered that nearly 80 per cent of single-baby pregnancies which ended in miscarriage involved foetuses with restricted growth in the first trimester. Now they hope this trend could be used as a predictor to identify those mothers most at risk

Almost half of women with early form breast cancer could be spared chemotherapy thanks to simple genetic test

Almost half of women with early form breast cancer could be spared chemotherapy thanks to simple genetic test46 per cent of patients often given unnecessary treatmentTest accurately assesses likelihood of recurrence and if further would treatment be beneficial Can help foster better decision making Almost half of women with the early stages of breast cancer could be spared unnecessary treatment thanks to a simple genetic test.