Cocaine addiction could be cured by zapping the brain with magnets

Zapping the brain with magnets could cure cocaine addiction Changing certain neurons in the brain using magnetic stimulation can wipe away addictionTreatment targets the prefrontal cortex – which controls impulses and decision making Could be tested immediately in humans By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 18:04 GMT, 3 April 2013 | UPDATED: 18:04 GMT, 3 April 2013 Cocaine addicts could be cured using a technique that stimulates the brain with magnets.

The pacemaker implanted in the brain that can prevent Alzheimer"s patients losing their memory

The 'pacemaker' implanted in the brain to prevent Alzheimer's patients losing their memory Device already used in people with Parkinson’s disease as possible means reversing cognitive declineEarly trials show the device appears to keep brain neurons activeHigh hopes will be viable alternative to drug treatments By Chris Murphy PUBLISHED: 17:13 GMT, 5 December 2012 | UPDATED: 17:54 GMT, 5 December 2012 A ‘pacemaker’ has been implanted in to the brain of an Alzheimer's patient in a bid to reduce memory loss.

From silencing snoring to easing depression, how doctors are using jolts of electricity to improve our health

From silencing snoring to easing depression, how doctors are using jolts of electricity to improve our health | UPDATED: 00:54 GMT, 22 May 2012 Every day, scores of patients across the UK receive electric shocks from their doctor.

Passing electric current through the brain "lifts half of patients from depression"

Passing electric current through the brain 'lifts half of patients from depression' | UPDATED: 21:10 GMT, 8 March 2012 Passing electric currents through the brain has been found to lift half of patients out of depression, according to a new study.

Depression: Brain pacemaker could finally give relief to long-suffering depressives

A cure for depression Brain pacemaker puts 58% of patients into remission After two years 92% of patients tested had responded to the treatment People suffering from depression and bipolar disorder who don't respond to drugs and therapy could finally find relief from their symptoms thanks to a brain pacemaker. The medical device is implanted under the skull and sends electrical impulses deep into the brain