Bird flu strain has begun to mutate into form "more likely" to cause human pandemic

Bird flu strain has begun to mutate into form 'more likely' to cause human pandemic Warning comes days after authorities in China announced they had identified cases of H7N9Flu experts are currently picking through DNA data of victims to assess severity of the strainVirus needs a 'very close eye kept on it' say experts By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 16:59 GMT, 3 April 2013 | UPDATED: 16:59 GMT, 3 April 2013 A deadly strain of bird flu previously unknown in people has begun to mutate into a form more likely to cause a human pandemic, scientists say.

The father who diagnosed himself with prostate cancer after watching a TV programme – and how it got him an MBE

The father who diagnosed himself with prostate cancer after watching a TV programme – and how it got him an MBEPhil Kissi, 54, suffered no symptoms but was diagnosed with an aggressive strain of prostate cancerA chance viewing of City Hospital prompted him to get testedBeing of black African decent and having a family history of prostate cancer increased his riskHe has now pledged to spend the rest of his life raising money for charity and helping disadvantaged young people | UPDATED: 03:37 GMT, 1 January 2013 As a former athlete, sitting down to watch daytime TV wasn't something Phil Kissi usually did.

RAF serviceman diagnosed with testicular cancer only after seeking treatment for groin injury caused by booted rugby ball

Saved by a groin strain: RAF serviceman was diagnosed with cancer only when he sought treatment for rugby injuryShane McMullen, 28, was left in agonising pain after the ball was booted at him during a match with his armed forces colleagues in Cyprus in FebruaryFather-of-two is grateful excruciating injury occurred as otherwise the cancer, which spread to his stomach, would likely not have been detected | UPDATED: 11:16 GMT, 31 May 2012 An RAF serviceman hit in the groin with a rugby ball was diagnosed with testicular cancer when he sought treatment for the injury.

Deadly strain of MRSA now resistant to a last-line antibiotic used to treat infections

Deadly strain of MRSA now resistant to a last-line antibiotic used to treat infections | UPDATED: 03:00 GMT, 22 May 2012 A deadly strain of a hospital superbug has become resistant to a last-line antibiotic used to treat infections, scientists have warned.

MRSA strain USA300: Flesh-eating bug spread by coughs and sneezes "has spread from U.S. to UK"

Flesh-eating bug spread by coughs and sneezes spreading across the UK USA300 can cause large boils on the skin and is resistant to treatment by several front-line antibioticsEasily passed through skin-to-skin contact A flesh-eating form of pneumonia that is easily passed between healthy people on public transport is spreading across the UK, experts have warned.