NHS diabetes care "lottery": Thousands could face blindness, strokes and death because of variations in treatment

1m an hour 'lottery' of NHS diabetes care: Thousands face complications including blindness, strokes and even death because of 'shocking' variations in treatmentFailures are leading to premature deaths according to Parliamentary groupAlmost half of sufferers not getting nine recommended annual checks By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 01:31 GMT, 20 March 2013 | UPDATED: 11:21 GMT, 20 March 2013 Thousands of people with diabetes are being failed by ‘shocking variations’ in NHS treatment, warn MPs.

1m an hour "lottery" of NHS diabetes care: Thousands face complications including blindness, strokes and even death because of…

1m an hour 'lottery' of NHS diabetes care: Thousands face complications including blindness, strokes and even death because of 'shocking' variations in treatmentFailures are leading to premature deaths according to Parliamentary groupAlmost half of sufferers not getting nine recommended annual checks By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 01:31 GMT, 20 March 2013 | UPDATED: 01:31 GMT, 20 March 2013 Thousands of people with diabetes are being failed by ‘shocking variations’ in NHS treatment, warn MPs.

Woman suffers TWO strokes by the age of 30 (defying odds of a billion to one) – but says ordeal helped her finally find love

Woman suffers TWO strokes by the age of 30 (defying odds of a billion to one) – but says ordeal helped her finally find love Colette Boyd, from Glasgow, suffered her first stroke aged just 28 Against odds of a billion to one, suffered another stroke a year later Missing the buzz of working in an office, she visited an internet chatroom There met now-husband Pete, 46, who has shared love of music and football By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 11:41 GMT, 20 February 2013 | UPDATED: 11:59 GMT, 20 February 2013 True love: Collette Boyd suffered TWO strokes by the age of 30, but says her ordeal helped her meet her husband Pete A woman who suffered two strokes before the age of 30 – defying odds of a billion to one – has finally found love thanks to her illness.

Grandmother says parrot saves her life by waking her when she stops breathing in her sleep

Who's a clever boy then Grandmother says parrot saves her life by waking her when she stops breathing in her sleep Barbara Smith-Schafer, 62, has sleep apnoea, which causes her to stop breathing and can lead to heart attack and stroke If she nods off during the day, her parrot Dominic flaps and pecks to wake her up Brainy parrot is also BI-LINGUAL and can speak English and German | UPDATED: 19:31 GMT, 12 December 2012 A grandmother claims her parrot has saved her life after she developed a life-threatening illness that stops her breathing while asleep.

Anti-depressants could help stroke patients recover more quickly by "rebuilding" the brain

Anti-depressants could help stroke patients recover more quickly by 'rebuilding' the brain Drugs could promote the growth of new nerve cells in the brain or protect other cells damaged by strokeAnd by preventing depression, they may encourage more patients to be physically active | UPDATED: 00:07 GMT, 6 December 2012 Anti-depressants could help recovery after a stroke – even in patients who are not depressed, research suggests.

Pensioner with head wound forced to direct lost ambulance crew to hospital

Pensioner with head wound forced to direct ambulance crew to local hospital after they get lost Ian Taylor waited 90 minutes for an ambulance after a head wound began bleeding profuselyIt then took 62 minutes to reach Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, which was just three miles from Mr Taylor's homeThe ambulance Trust involved apologised and said two sat nav systems had failed | UPDATED: 12:18 GMT, 3 December 2012 Mr Taylor had to give his ambulance driver directions to a hospital three miles from his home in Cambridgeshire A pensioner who had to wait 90 minutes for an ambulance was amazed when he had to give paramedics directions to the local hospital.

Crippling energy prices and badly insulated homes will lead to the loss of thousands of lives and seriously damage older peoples health this winter,…

Cold homes are triggering heart attacks and strokes in older people – and costing the NHS 1.36billion a year<br>Age UK report says living in a cold home is a 'major factor' in two out of five extra winter deathsRates in Britain higher than Scandinavia, which has colder winters – but better insulation Around 8,000 extra deaths for every one degree drop in average temperature <p> | <strong>UPDATED:</strong> 00:27 GMT, 22 November 2012 </p> <img src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/11/21/article-2236440-00E31D83000004B0-433_233x423.jpg" width="233" height="423" alt="Living in a cold home is a 'major factor' in two out of five extra winter deaths" class="blkBorder" /> <p class="imageCaption">Living in a cold home is a 'major factor' in two out of five extra winter deaths</p> <p> Crippling energy prices and badly insulated homes will lead to the loss of thousands of lives and seriously damage older people&#8217;s health this winter, warns a new report.</p><p>It shows cold homes are costing the NHS 1.36 billion every year in hospital and primary care as older people struggle with respiratory problems, stroke and heart attacks triggered by the cold.</p><p>Around 27,000 excess winter deaths are expected this year, including avoidable fatalities among older people, says the charity Age UK.</p><p>In a new report The Cost of Cold, it says a &#8216;major factor&#8217; in two out of five extra winter deaths is living in a cold home.</p><p>It says superior building standards in countries like Finland and Sweden which insist on insulation and double glazing mean they have warmer homes than in the UK, which has a milder climate.</p><p>There are higher rates of excess winter deaths – above what would normally be expected – in Britain compared with Scandinavian countries.</p><p>Older people living in cold homes are at higher risk of death and illnesses such as arthritis and rheumatism, with the risks going up as temperatures plummet.

Hospital death rate surges at weekends with some patients up to 42% more likely to die

Hospital patients 'up to 42% more likely to die' if admitted at weekends Patients with liver disease or heart disease most at risk Aortic aneurism and stroke victims also did badly Statistics blamed on fewer staff on duty and fewer scans carried out at weekends | UPDATED: 16:03 GMT, 16 October 2012 Critically-ill patients are up to 42 per cent more likely to die in hospital if they are admitted at weekends, it has emerged.

DR ELLIE CANNON: There can be good reasons for "bed blocking"

There can be good reasons for 'bed blocking' | UPDATED: 21:00 GMT, 29 September 2012 The horrible label ‘bed blockers’ – elderly patients well enough to go home but with nowhere to go – surfaced again last week as the Department of Health said £4 million a week is spent on these individuals.