Simple blood test that predicts if a woman"s breast cancer is likely to return

Simple blood test that predicts if a woman's breast cancer is likely to return Test detects genetic changes in DNA that could signal return of most common form of breast cancer Early warning could spare some women unnecessary treatment with gruelling anti-cancer drugs By Fiona Macrae PUBLISHED: 17:37 GMT, 18 January 2013 | UPDATED: 18:21 GMT, 18 January 2013 A simple blood test could predict if the most common form of breast cancer will come back after treatment, say scientists.

Children born to older women have a better start in life, claims study

Children born to older women have a better start in life, claims study Nine-month-old had 9.5% risk of having accident if mother was 20 and 6.1% risk if mother was 40Children also more likely to have vital immunisation if mother was older | UPDATED: 11:46 GMT, 22 August 2012 Children born to older mothers appear to have a healthier start in life as they are less likely to be admitted to hospital and more likely to have vital immunisation jabs, say researchers.

Are you drinking too much water? Millions chugging "excessive" two litres a day are wasting their efforts

Are you drinking too much water Millions chugging 'excessive' two litres a day are wasting their timeCompanies with 'vested interest' promoting idea we need eight glasses a dayCoffee, tea and food contribute to our fluid intake | UPDATED: 07:47 GMT, 6 June 2012 Health advice to drink eight glasses of water a day is over the top and does not help with weight loss, says a leading nutritionist.

Finding exercise a chore? How a virtual partner can trick you into working harder

Finding exercise a chore How a virtual partner can trick you into working twice as hard Women cycling alongside a virtual partner exercised for twice as long as those going solo | UPDATED: 11:11 GMT, 17 May 2012 Those who are struggling to keep going to the gym should think about recruiting an exercise partner – as long as they are a little fitter than you.

One in six cancers are caused by preventable infections

One in six cancers are caused by preventable infections Cervical cancer accounted for around half of the infection-related cancers in women UPDATED: 22:00 GMT, 8 May 2012 Two types of the human papilloma virus (HPV) cause around 70 per cent of all cervical cancers One in six cancers are caused by preventable infections, research shows.

Stopping smoking DOESNT make you more stressed, say successful quitters

Stopping smoking DOESN’T make you more stressed, say successful quitters Smokers who are worried they will struggle to stay calm after throwing out their cigarettes should take note – a study has found quitters cope with stress just as well after beating the habit.

Turbo Shandy promo team slammed for handing out free alcohol to blood donors

Drinks company slammed for handing out free alcohol to student blood donorsStudents given cases of shandy outside temporary blood bank “Inappropriate general health message conveyed through this promotion”Campaign has now been terminated A drinks company has been slammed for handing out free alcohol to teenage blood donors. Photographs posted via Facebook showed students being given cases of Turbo shandy as they queued at a temporary blood bank outside a church in Leeds, West Yorkshire. Promotional materials released in the run up to the event read: ‘Donate blood this week in Leeds and claim your FREE Drink from Turbo’s Promo Team’.

Modern chemotherapy drugs cut breast cancer deaths by 30 per cent

Modern chemotherapy drugs cut breast cancer deaths by 30 per cent1980s standard chemotherapy treatment reduced death rates by almost 25 per centProof better drugs and drug combinations are now available A study has found modern chemotherapy drugs cut breast cancer deaths by around 30 per cent Modern chemotherapy drugs cut breast cancer deaths by around 30 per cent a study has revealed. This compares with the 1980s when standard chemotherapy treatment reduced death rates by almost 25 per cent.

Grandmother receives payout after doctors wrongly removed her stomach

Grandmother has stomach removed after doctors wrongly diagnose her with deadly tumour Patient”s lawyer claims mistake “wasn”t an individual human error but involved a team of clinicians” A pensioner whose stomach was mistakenly removed by surgeons has received a compensation payout A pensioner whose stomach was mistakenly removed by surgeons has received a substantial compensation payout. The 74-year-old grandmother from Rugeley, Staffordshire, was misdiagnosed with stomach cancer in 2004 and underwent major surgery to have the supposedly life-threatening tumour removed. But medics later discovered that the operation was unnecessary as test results taken at Cannock Chase and Stafford General hospitals had been wrongly interpreted and the mass was benign