The little girl who"s had her life-saving oxygen supply fitted to her toy suitcase

Free to explore, the little girl with chronic lung disease whose life-saving oxygen supply is fitted to her Trunki toy suitcase Eight-year-old Jessica needs oxygen from a tank to avoid brain damageSuffers from conditions such as cerebral palsy and chronic lung diseaseCurrent mobile oxygen supplies were too big, so her mum had to carry themHas now had her Trunki – a toy suitcase – modified to carry the cylinder By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 17:17 GMT, 16 April 2013 | UPDATED: 19:54 GMT, 16 April 2013 Eight-year-old Jessica, with foster mother Carolyn, has become the first person to have her life-saving oxygen supply transported in her toy luggage An eight-year-old girl has become the first person to be given a life-saving oxygen supply in her toy luggage.

The best Christmas present ever: Parents" joy as daughter, 4, makes miraculous recovery from a STROKE

Parents' joy as daughter, 4, makes miraculous recovery from a STROKE Mabel's father thought she had food poisoning after she fell ill during a shopping tripShe was rushed to hospital after her condition worsened and an MRI scan revealed she had suffered a strokeShe was then sent by helicopter to a specialist hospital where surgeons managed to stem the bleedingThe youngster had to re-learn how to walk but within a week she ran out of the hospital.

Scottish NHS dossier reveals failings that lead to death

Patient killed in oxygen explosion as a second dies in broken lift: Damning dossier reveals NHS failings that caused death First study shows 345 serious incidents in Scotland including 100 deathsPneumonia patient died after being left for nine days without medicationShocking report reveals another patient had wrong organs stapled together | UPDATED: 15:19 GMT, 26 November 2012 A horrifying catalogue of serious errors at NHS hospitals in Scotland has come to light, following a Freedom of Information request.

The deadly explosion after a patient on oxygen lit a cigarette and the broken lift that cost another life: Damning dossier of NHS failings in Scotland…

Patient killed in oxygen explosion as a second dies in broken lift: Damning dossier reveals NHS failings that lead to death First study shows 345 serious incidents in Scotland including 100 deathsPneumonia patient died after being left for nine days without medicationShocking report reveals another patient had wrong organs stapled together | UPDATED: 12:02 GMT, 26 November 2012 A horrifying catalogue of serious errors at NHS hospitals in Scotland has come to light, following a Freedom of Information request.

Blast of sound that can give your love life a lift: From sponge pellets to pumps and even sound waves, what"s best for impotence?

Blast of sound that can give your love life a lift: From sponge pellets to pumps and even sound waves, what's best for impotence | UPDATED: 20:54 GMT, 17 September 2012 Because of the possibility of underlying health problems, erectile dysfunction should be investigated by your doctor Though they may not want to talk about it, at any one time around one in ten British men suffers from erectile dysfunction (ED) — the inability to have and maintain an erection.

Food shortages could turn the world vegetarian by 2050, warn leading scientists

Food shortages could turn most of the world vegetarian by 2050, warn leading scientists Fresh warning claims spiraling population will mean major meat shortagesClaim there will not be enough water to produce crops by 2050 based on current diets. The world may have to become almost entirely vegetarian, leading scientists have warned.

Beltsville Agricultural Research Center: Scientists preserve and capture microscopic side of snowflakes

The secrets of snowflakes: Scientists capture incredible close-ups of ice crystals (but they had to freeze the microscope to -170C to get the shots)Hydrologists study the snowflakes” composition to understand their effects on ecosystemNaturally occurring snowflakes are collected outside Maryland research center and shipped in .Photographed using a specialized microscope whose viewing stage is chilled to -170C, scientists in Maryland are showing a whole new side to what”s caught on the tip of our tongues.