The cancer survival lottery: More patients are surviving than ever but where you live can make a real difference

The cancer survival lottery: More patients are surviving than ever but where you live can make a real difference For men, biggest increase in survival was in colon and prostate cancerIn women, biggest leap in survival was seen in cervical cancer patientsBut patients still face wide variations depending on where they live By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 18:06 GMT, 18 April 2013 | UPDATED: 18:06 GMT, 18 April 2013 Cancer patients face 'wide and persistent' variations in survival rates depending on where they live, according to a new report.

Pensioner who had heart attack had to be carried out of her bedroom window by a CRANE to keep her heart beating

Pensioner who had heart attack had to be carried out of her bedroom window by a CRANE to keep her heart beating Paramedics were called to Joan Smith, 78, who'd collapsed upstairs at home Each time paramedics tried to carry her downstairs, her heart stoppedRealised that in order to save Mrs Smith, she would need to be kept flat Being in an upright position can put strain on the heart Paramedics had to use an aerial ladder platform to get her to the ambulance By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 09:46 GMT, 17 April 2013 | UPDATED: 10:04 GMT, 17 April 2013 A woman who suffered a heart attack had to be carried out of her bedroom window using a crane.

Meet SuperTed, the brave little boy with a serious heart defect who"s battling to stay alive

Meet SuperTed, the brave little boy with a serious heart defect who's battling to stay alive Ted Rourke has defect that stops oxygen being pumped around his bodySix-month-old has already survived two bouts of major surgery Now being kept alive by a heart bypass and a feeding machineHis bravery has earned him the nickname SuperTed, after cartoon character By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 18:28 GMT, 6 February 2013 | UPDATED: 21:19 GMT, 6 February 2013 The parents of a baby boy with a killer heart defect have spoken of his gruelling battle to stay alive.

How our "stiff upper lip" hits cancer survival rates: Britons are dying needlessly because they refuse to seek help for early symptoms

How our 'stiff upper lip' hits cancer survival rates: Britons are dying needlessly because they refuse to seek help for early symptomsStudy suggests Britons are embarrassed or reluctant to waste doctors' timeSurvey questioned 19,079 people aged 50 and older in six countriesExperts say British stoicism could explain differences in cancer survival By Jenny Hope PUBLISHED: 01:44 GMT, 30 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:44 GMT, 30 January 2013 Early intervention: A study found people in Britain do not seek help for early symptoms of cancer because they are embarrassed or reluctant to waste their doctors' time Having a ‘stiff upper lip’ could mean some Britons are dying needlessly from cancer, warn researchers.

Cancer patients who say No to a mastectomy "more likely to survive"

Cancer patients who say No to a mastectomy 'more likely to survive' By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 01:15 GMT, 28 January 2013 | UPDATED: 01:16 GMT, 28 January 2013 Many women diagnosed with breast cancer choose to have a mastectomy thinking it will remove the tumours as quickly as possible and give them the best chance of survival Women stand a better chance of surviving breast cancer if they don’t have a mastectomy, a major study has found.

Just a 15 minute stroll four times a week can reduce the risk of an early death by 40%

Just a 15 minute stroll four times a week can reduce the risk of an early death by 40% Fresh air and exercise can boost the immune system, strengthen bones and reduce obesityRegular walking also means better physical health, better strength and a reduced risk of injuries from falls By Anna Hodgekiss PUBLISHED: 12:30 GMT, 15 January 2013 | UPDATED: 12:35 GMT, 15 January 2013 Even a 15-minute stroll in the open air gives a better chance of extending longevity by a few years Older people who take a short walk just four times a week reduce the risk of an early death by a staggering 40 per cent.

Latest life-extending cancer drugs "rationed by postcode": Recommended treatments are handed out in some hospitals but not others

Life-extending cancer drugs 'rationed by postcode': Dozens of hospitals refuse to hand out treamentsDozens of trusts failing to hand out treatments for bowel, ovarian, lung and brain cancerSome of the drugs boost survival rates by a quarter and others extend lives By Sophie Borland PUBLISHED: 23:50 GMT, 10 January 2013 | UPDATED: 03:05 GMT, 11 January 2013 Hospitals are denying patients the latest life-extending cancer drugs, a report reveals.

Can you get up off the floor without using your hands? If not you could be heading for an early grave

Why you could be heading for an early grave if you can't get off the floor without using your handsSimple test asked 50 to 80-year-olds to sit on the floor and stand up with as little support as possibleAdults who needed to use a number of aids such as their hands and knees were six times more likely to die than those who didn't | UPDATED: 12:00 GMT, 13 December 2012 A simple 'standing up' test could predict mortality, research shows.

Patients at high risk of cancer could be told to take aspirin: Taking tablet regularly "can cut risk of developing disease by a third"

Patients at high risk of cancer could be told to take aspirin: Taking tablet regularly 'can cut risk of developing disease by a third' | UPDATED: 00:08 GMT, 12 December 2012 Professor Sir Mike Richards said that the odds of survival for lung cancer have'barely been improving' over the last five years Patients at high risk of developing cancer could be prescribed regular doses of aspirin under plans to tackle the rising number of cases.

Common diabetes drug may help combat ovarian cancer by slowing tumour growth

Common diabetes drug may help combat ovarian cancer by slowing tumour growth The drug, which costs 1.30 a day, has also been found to stop tumours spreadingOverian cancer is one of the deadliest types of the disease | UPDATED: 05:07 GMT, 3 December 2012 Breakthrough: A pill used to treat diabetes could double a woman's chances of surviving ovarian cancer A pill commonly taken for diabetes could double a woman’s chance of surviving ovarian cancer, researchers believe.