St Georges Hospital: NHS failed to give Isla Taylor "basic medical care" says coroner as she dies following operation

Three-year-old girl died because hospital doctors failed to give her 'basic medical care', says coroner Isla's blood pressure was 'unacceptably low', finds coronerShe suffered a catalogue of errors during surgery on her airways Doctors failed to hand over properly between teams caring for the little girlHer death was 'avoidable' Parents pay tribute to their 'energetic little girl' | UPDATED: 20:00 GMT, 19 September 2012 A coroner accused staff at a top London hospital of ‘gross failure’ today, following the death of a three-year-old girl in a paediatrics intensive care unit.

Baby with less than 5% chance of survival has life-saving surgery after parents find pioneering procedure online

Baby with less than 5% chance of survival has life-saving surgery after parents find pioneering procedure online Couple told unborn baby had 50 per cent survival chance but this was then revised to five per cent Parents' online research uncovered a risky treatment performed in the womb that involved inserting a balloon into their son's trachea Operation had 33 per cent risk of miscarriage | UPDATED: 07:54 GMT, 8 August 2012 A baby given less than five per cent chance of surviving birth is now fighting fit, after his parents found out about a life-saving procedure on the internet.

Rare oesophagus condition: Girl, 3, who takes four minutes to eat a strawberry – because gobbling her food could kill her

Girl, 3, who takes four minutes to eat a strawberry – because gobbling her food could kill her Milly had 13 operations to disconnect her trachea and oesophagusShe can't eat carrots, mango, melon or rice as they can get stuck | UPDATED: 16:18 GMT, 9 May 2012 Milly with mother Kaylee: The youngster had 13 operations on her oesophagus to widen it A three-year-old girl suffers from a rare digestive condition which means she can't gobble down her food – because it could kill her.

Transplants: Patients could one day "grow" new organs from their own stem cells to replace failing body parts

Patients will 'grow' new organs from their own cells to replace failing body parts, says pioneering surgeon At least 1,000 Britons die each year while waiting for a new heart, kidney or liver | UPDATED: 12:06 GMT, 9 March 2012 Patients could one day 'grow' new organs from their own stem cells to replace failing body parts, a leading transplant surgeon says.