<br>Toddler who was sick up to 20 times a day due to rare digestive disorder finally cured thanks to landmark surgery<br>
Leah Hamid, now two, suffered from a
rare disorder which stopped her digesting food and
caused chronic sicknessBecame the first child in the UK with her condition to have a procedure that left no scar Slept through the night for the first time ever after operation <br>

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<strong>UPDATED:</strong>

16:53 GMT, 23 November 2012

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<p>A toddler who was violently sick almost every hour of the day for the first 18 months of her life has finally been cured.</p><p>Leah Hamid, now two, suffered from a rare digestive disorder, which stopped her from digesting her food and caused chronic sickness.</p><p>She slept through the night for the first time since her birth after specialist surgeons opened up an obstruction causing the condition.<br></p>
<img src="http://www.big-wife.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/2d35article-2237452-162D1DB0000005DC-411_634x432.jpg" width="634" height="432" alt="Leah Hamid, now two, suffered from a rare disorder which stopped her digesting food and caused chronic sickness" class="blkBorder" />
<p class="imageCaption">Leah Hamid, now two, suffered from a rare disorder which stopped her digesting food and caused chronic sickness</p>
<p> </p> <p>Leah's condition, called duodenal stenosis, is a rare birth defect where a portion of the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) is narrowed.</p><p>This prevents the stomach contents from flowing through at a normal rate. It's not known what causes the condition, although there may be a genetic link.

</p><p>Fortunately, surgeons at The Children&#8217;s Hospital, Sheffield, were confident that surgery would resolve the situation.</p><p>And, in a lucky twist of fate, Leah would be the first child with her condition to have a procedure that left no scar. <br></p><p>In the past, duodenal stenosis has been treated by an invasive operation which leaves scarring.</p>
<p>But rather than making an incision to access the duodenum, surgeons decided they could access it by putting a flexible telescope down Leah's throat.</p>
<img src="http://www.big-wife.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/5c05article-2237452-162D1DA6000005DC-394_634x534.jpg" width="634" height="534" alt="She slept through the night for the first time ever after specialist surgeons opened up an obstruction causing the condition" class="blkBorder" />
<p class="imageCaption">She slept through the night for the first time ever after specialist surgeons opened up an obstruction causing the condition</p>
<p> </p><p>During the three-hour procedure, they freed up the obstruction in her small intestine, leaving no scar or sign of surgery. <br></p><p>Doctors snipped holes in the membrane covering
the first part of her small intestine connecting her stomach to her
digestive system using a balloon and electrical knife.</p>
<p>Leah's mother Amanda, 34, said: 'She was like a different child after the operation, she recovered straight away and wasn&#8217;t sick.</p><p>'When she slept through the night for the first time ever I almost cried. My body naturally woke me up throughout the night to check on her and when I found her fast asleep it was amazing. I was so happy my baby was finally better.'</p>
<img src="http://www.big-wife.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/ec50article-2237452-162D1DAB000005DC-621_634x530.jpg" width="634" height="530" alt="Now recovered, Leah can play with her sister Alisha and brother Callum again " class="blkBorder" />
<p class="imageCaption">Now recovered, Leah can play with her sister Alisha and brother Callum again </p>
<p>Mrs Hamid, who also has five other
children, Ashley 17, Adam 15, Alisha 11, Callum six and Cayden 18
months, continued: 'We are so grateful for the help the surgeons have
given not only to Leah and me but to my husband and all our children. <br>
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<p>'Now Leah is living a normal life we have much more time to spend as a family and I can concentrate on all my children equally.' </p><p>Mr Sean Marven, consultant paediatric surgeon at Sheffield Children&#8217;s NHS Foundation Trust, who performed the operation with colleague Dr Mike Thomson, said: 'I believe this procedure has never been performed on a child with this condition in the UK before due to the rare specialist skills and equipment it requires.</p><p>'I decided the it was possible as my colleague is a rare paediatric endoscopist who has the skills to perform the procedure, and because we possess the specialist equipment needed, including a double channel operating endoscope which cost 64,000, and was funded by The Children's Hospital Charity.'</p><p>He added: 'The operation was a complete
success, Leah was in much less pain and had a quicker recovery. If it
had been done the regular way it would have left a big scar. We don&#8217;t
expect her to have any problems later in life.'</p><p><br></p>