Young mother 26, drinks 25 LITRES of water a day… but doctors have no idea whySasha Kennedy downs almost six gallons during a 24-hour periodThe mother-of-two – who says she has
no health problems – wakes up several times a night to sip water
and go to the toiletShe claims to have left a job because the quality of the company's tap water was not good enough

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UPDATED:

14:10 GMT, 11 July 2012

A young mother has revealed her bizarre addiction to drinking water – downing up to 25 litres per day.

Sasha Kennedy, 26, has almost six gallons during a 24-hour period, even taking large bottles around with her wherever she goes.

She goes to the toilet up to 40 times every day and claims she has even left jobs over the lack of quality water.

You drink how much Sasha Kennedy with a selection of bottles of her favourite tipple

You drink how much Sasha Kennedy with a selection of bottles of her favourite tipple

The mother-of-two – who says she has
no health problems – even wakes up several times a night to sip water
and go to the toilet.

Sasha said: 'If I feel my mouth start to get dry I have to get my next fix of water – it’s all I can focus on.

'People never really think anyone can drink that much until they get to know me, then they just cannot believe their eyes.

'I feel thirsty pretty much all the time and always have to be sipping water – it’s an addictive habit.

Glass half full: The young mother-of-two drinks 25 litres of water a day, the equivalent of 100 glasses

Glass half full: The young mother-of-two drinks 25 litres of water a day, the equivalent of 100 glasses

'The most sleep I’ve ever had is about one hour and 15 minutes, because I am getting up to drink or nip to the loo.'

Sasha, of Southend-on-Sea, Essex, who is a full-time mother to children Reggie, two,
and Fraser, one, developed her habit when she was just two.

She
began nagging her parents for more water, quickly prompting them to
take her to the doctors – who confirmed there was nothing wrong with
her.

Her addiction kept
growing as she got older and by the age of six her mum was placing a
plastic jug full of water next to her bed each night.

AN UNCOMMON CLINICAL DISORDER

Psychogenic polydipsia is an uncommon clinical disorder characterized by excessive water-drinking in the absence of a physiologic stimulus to drink.

It is commonly, although not always, encountered in patients with psychiatric disorders.

Complications can include incontinence as well as renal and congestive heart failure. Patients can also suffer from potentially fatal water intoxication when the balance of electrolytes in the brain is disrupted.

The diagnosis is one of exclusion. Management includes fluid restriction along with behavioural therapy and certain drugs.

Eventually, she began to get up each night and refill the large container – doubling her nightly intake.

The
schoolgirl always took a bottle of water to class with her and would
stay glued next to the water fountain at break time while the other kids
went out to play.

/07/11/article-2171928-1403ECC9000005DC-119_306x423.jpg” width=”306″ height=”423″ alt=”Drinking up: The mother-of-two – who claims she has no health problems – even wakes up several times a night to sip water and go to the toilet” class=”blkBorder” />

Drinking up: The mother-of-two – who claims she has no health problems – even wakes up several times a night to sip water and go to the toilet

'Going on holiday is a nightmare, too.
If I go somewhere hot like Spain I have to take bottles of water around
with me – it can be quite expensive.

'I’ve had boyfriends who get
disturbed during the night when I get up to drink and go to the loo –
but it has become normal for me now.'

Experts said Sasha's water addiction was rare – and that most adults only drink 200ml per day.

Dr
Emma Derbyshire, a nutrition consultant, said: 'Over-hydrating with any
fluid is possible and in extreme cases it can be dangerous, but this is
very rare.

'To put it
into context, the average Briton drinks just 200ml of water a day – less
than one glass out of the recommended six to eight glasses of fluid a
day.'

Kinvara Carey, general manager of the Natural Hydration Council, said most women should only be drinking 1.6-litres per day.

She said: 'The European Food Safety Authority recommend men should be drinking two litres of water from fluids a day and women 1.6 litres of water from fluids.

'This is supported by the Department of Health who recommend that we should drink 6-8 glasses of fluid a day.

'Drinking water is one of the healthiest ways to hydrate as it contains no sugar or calories.

'The importance of hydration should not be underestimated. The average Briton drinks just 200ml of water a day – less than one glass out of the six to eight glasses.'

CAN DRINKING TOO MUCH WATER BE BAD FOR YOUR HEALTH

While a lack of water can be damaging, it is also dangerous to have too much water.

This can trigger hyponatraemia, a
condition where the amount of salts in the blood become too diluted.
This leads to the brain cells being flooded with water, leading to
confusion, fits and even death.

In 2007, fitness instructor David Rogers, 22, died of hyponatraemia after finishing the London Marathon.

In 2008, dieter Dawn Page was awarded
810,000 after she followed advice to drink six pints of water a day,
which led to her suffering a fit as a result of hyponatraemia.

Tragic: Andrew Thornton, 44, died from drinking vast amounts of cold water

Illness: Actor Anthony Andrews, left, pictured with Jeremy Irons in Brideshead Revisted, was hit by illness after drinking too much water

Tragic: Andrew Thornton, left, died from drinking vast amounts of cold water; and actor Anthony Andrews, seen left in the picture with Jeremy Irons in Brideshead Revisted, was hit by illness after drinking too much water

The same year, Andrew Thornton, 44, died from drinking vast amounts of cold water to relieve painful gums, ‘overloading’ his body after drinking ten litres – more than 17 pints – in eight hours.

And in 2003 actor Anthony Andrews, who
starred in the ITV adaptation of Brideshead Revisited, was hit by the
illness after drinking too much water during rehearsals for a West End
role.

The Department of Health recommends
that we should drink about 1.2 litres of fluid every day to prevent
dehydration, or more in hotter climates, according to the NHS Choices website.

It says the total amount of water we
need to replace each day is more than this – about 2.5 litres – but
fluid from food and the body's chemical reactions contribute. The rest
needs to be taken from drinks.

However, last year Glasgow-based GP
Margaret McCartney said the NHS Choices website’s advice that people
should drink six to eight glasses a day is ‘not only nonsense, but
thoroughly debunked nonsense’.

She added that the benefits of the
drink are often exaggerated by ‘organisations with vested interests’
such as bottled water brands.

Writing in the British Medical
Journal, Dr McCartney also pointed out that research showed that
drinking when not thirsty can impair concentration, rather than boost
it, and separate evidence suggests that chemicals used for disinfection
found in bottled water could be bad for your health.

Drinking excessive amounts can also
lead to loss of sleep as people have to get up in the night to go to the
toilet, and other studies show it can even cause kidney damage, instead
of preventing it.